Tag Archives: Food Not Lawns

Kent Food Not Lawns – July Food Swap

Kent Food Not Lawns is hosting a food swap

Where:  Kent Social Services – 1066 S Water St, Kent, OH

When:  July 9, 2014 – 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM

A food swap is an event where people meet to share homemade, homegrown, and foraged foods (including plant starts and seeds).  No money changes hands but instead attendees bring items they wish to swap for other’s produce.  Packaging and labeling does help.

Each unique item will have a sheet placed in front of it.  During the “walking around” phase, swappers will write down what they are willing to trade for a given item (sheets will be provided).  For example, if you have jars of jelly and you want a loaf of bread, you put down your name and “jars of jelly” on the bread sheet.  During the swap phase, you find people who want your products and whose produce you want.  Sometimes you can get someone to trade even if they didn’t write down a bid on your sheet, but this is usually only if they have extra they don’t want to have to take home.

Schedule:

6:30-7:00   Sign in and set up

7:00-7:30   Walk around, sample, and bid

7:30-8:00   Swap!

Sign up here:

For additional questions, please contact kentfoodnotlawns@gmail.com

Kent Ohio Food Not Lawns – June Food Swap

Kent Food Not Lawns is hosting a food swap

Where:  Kent Social Services – 1066 S Water St, Kent, OH

When:  June 10, 2014 – 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM

A food swap is an event where people meet to share homemade, homegrown, and foraged foods (including plant starts and seeds).  No money changes hands but instead attendees bring items they wish to swap for other’s produce.  Packaging and labeling does help.

Each unique item will have a sheet placed in front of it.  During the “walking around” phase, swappers will write down what they are willing to trade for a given item (sheets will be provided).  For example, if you have jars of jelly and you want a loaf of bread, you put down your name and “jars of jelly” on the bread sheet.  During the swap phase, you find people who want your products and whose produce you want.  Sometimes you can get someone to trade even if they didn’t write down a bid on your sheet, but this is usually only if they have extra they don’t want to have to take home.

Schedule:

6:30-7:00   Sign in and set up

7:00-7:30   Walk around, sample, and bid

7:30-8:00   Swap!

Sign up here:

For additional questions, please contact kentfoodnotlawns@gmail.com

Spring Snarky Thoughts 2014

The Snarky Gardener is ready for the growing season

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The Snarky Gardener at an apple pruning workshop – 3/29/2014

Spring has been a fun and interesting time to be a snarky gardener. I’ve taken in some workshops, and taken in some new edible varieties. Last year was all about growing my own starts and saving seeds. This year so far seems to be about expanding my knowledge, contacts (through Food Not Lawns and the Kent Community TimeBank), and perennial plantings.

In March I took two workshops – one for bee keeping and one for tree pruning. Looks like bees will be a future project though now I’m now a member of the Stark County (Ohio) Beekeepers Association (even have a cool membership card in my wallet). A very passionate group but I’m not quite ready to have so many little lives dependent on me. The tree pruning workshop did pay immediate benefits as there’s an old apple tree way in the back yard. I’m not real fond of getting up on a ladder but the tree is 30 feet tall so not much a choice.  It did produce (small and holey) fruit last year and I’m hoping for better this season.  In early May, I attended a WordPress “camp”, where I picked up new knowledge to help these blog entries and this site be better for you.  I also concluded my permaculture class prematurely as my schedule has been full as of late.

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May 2014 Garden Plan

With permaculture slowly but surely changing my point of view, I’ve taken some steps to make my domain more permanent and perennial.  My two part article written earlier this year discussed perennial plant possibilities and I’ve taken steps to make them reality.  For the Snarky Garden, Egyptian Walking onions, ground nuts, mushrooms, strawberry spinach, and perennial kale (from Territorial) will be added to compliment already established sunchokes, strawberries, corn salad (via self seeding) and comfrey.  The whole north part (top in the plan) is evolving into only perennials.  I’ll never move to a whole perennial garden (I love tomatoes and potatoes too much), but half would be nice. Also, my foraging is getting more serious with grazing of garlic mustard, dandelion greens, hostas and violets picked right out of the yard.  I wanted to do maple syrup, but missed the February/March window, but there’s always next year.

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Garlic Mustard
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Egyptian Walking Onions from the Kent Community TimeBank

Kent Ohio Food Not Lawns Informational Meeting – 1/26/2014

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January 26, 2014 – 3 PM to 4:30 PM

Kent Free Library
312 W. Main St., Kent, OH
Upstairs in the meeting room

This is an informational meeting to discuss the group’s purpose and future events. Be prepared to discuss your gardening hopes and dreams. Feel free to bring a friend or two.

Sign up here

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Food Not Lawns, Cleveland Fourth Annual Seed Swap

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Saturday, January 25, 2014 – 11:00 AM to 3:00 PM

Grace Lutheran Church

13001 Cedar Rd, Cleveland Heights, OH

If you are interested in gardening, community, food security, permaculture, seed saving and sharing, this is the place for you!  Bring seeds (purchased or saved) if you have them, or consider what you might swap for seeds in goods or service, but come anyway.  We have a good collection and lots of information to share.  This year, we have signed the Safe Seed Pledge and will not knowing share GMO/Monsanto owned seed.

Joining us will be: Elle Addams of City Rising Farm, Judi Strauss, of The Charmed Kitchen, with herbs, books and more for sample and sale, Chris McClellan, of Natural Cottage Project, will demonstrate a rocket stove, gardeners of the Grace Lutheran Community Garden, and many more.

Refreshments are potluck.  Please bring a dish to share.  Also, collecting non perishable food donation for Hts’ Emergency Food Bank.  There will be a Freecycle table available to bring or take useful items.  Residue will be donated.

If you bring saved seeds, please label them with as much pertinent info as possible.  We will have envelopes and labels available.  New this year:  Seed Savers, who are willing, will be with their seeds at tables, to discuss traits, growing conditions, stories about them, and aspects of seed saving.  Donated seed will be available and asked to be considered a “loan” to be returned, if possible, the fooling swap.  The completed Saved Seed Inventory will be available for perusal, or check it out online at:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AhK_fFhk3xBNdFQxaHNGRF8zXzk1TU5DR2xzb0c1UXc&usp=sharing#gid=0

Freecycle info:   Please bring gently used ( or new) items to donate/swap.  If you have items left at the end of the day, take them home or leave them for donation pick­up Monday morning.

This event is free (donations gratefully accepted), child­friendly, on a bus­line and handicapped accessible.

Volunteers are needed to help set up and clean up.

Please contact Mari Keating @ beanpie55@att.net for more information

and visit foodnotlawnscleveland@yahoogroups.com

Food Not Lawns, Cleveland  Facebook group

http://www.meetup.com/Kent-Food-Not-Lawns/events/156126052/

Kent Ohio Food Not Lawns

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Gardening may seem like just a hobby to many people, but in fact growing food is one of the most radical things you can do: Those who control our food control our lives, and when we take that control back into our own hands, we empower ourselves toward autonomy, self-reliance, and true freedom.

Flores, Heather (2011-10-19). Food Not Lawns: How to Turn Your Yard into a Garden And Your Neighborhood into a Community (p. 2). Chelsea Green Publishing. Kindle Edition.

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The Snarky Gardener’s entry into gardening came about accidentally with a previous landlord tilling a 10′ by 50′ swath in the goldenrod infested, brick clay hard, no-mans land behind my duplex. Having little idea what I was doing, I filled the freshly tilled ground with plants I saw my parents grow when I was young – tomatoes, beans, peas, corn, onions, carrots, turnips, eggplants, and others. Some did great (beans, onions, and peas), others mediocre (tomatoes, turnips), and others not at all (carrots didn’t even come up, corn was stunted, etc). But I had enough success to ask myself “Could I grow all my own food?” And for me, that question changed everything, though I’m still far from that goal.

I first heard about “Food Not Lawns” when I attended my first Food Not Lawns Cleveland meeting in January 2013. With my food gardening background, it resonated with me instantly, though I didn’t (and still don’t) consider food gardening “radical”.  I wanted to find a group of like minded people to bond with, but organizations like gardening clubs didn’t seem to fit me.  The idea of growing plants and flowers just for their looks seemed superficial to me.  This group felt like my kind of people.

After recent discussions with Mari Keating, the fearless leader of Food Not Lawns Cleveland and rereading the book, I’ve decided to take the next step by starting “Kent Food Not Lawns“.   The FNL movement is “hyper-local” meaning each group should have a limited mile radius influence.  Since I’m 35 miles or so from the Cleveland group, creating a new one near me made sense (and keeps me from driving so much).  My hope is to find other local gardeners who want to grow food and help others do the same.

 

Tomato and Basil Time!

With spring in full force, my thoughts have turned to tomatoes and basil starts as I’ve been trading and selling them.  The Kent Community TimeBank has given me an outlet for them where I don’t need to worry about the exchange of money.  The truth of the matter is plant starts represent mostly time as they have to be treated like infants so the KCTB seems to be appropriate.  The basil has been more popular than I would have ever imagined, so I’ll make an effort next year to produce more.

On 5/12/2013, I attended the Foods Not Lawns Cleveland plant swap.  I traded 4 tomato starts (1 Mega Cherry cutting from my AeroGarden and 3 Sweet 100 Cherry starts).  In return, I received two Chocolate Cherry tomatoes, two Long Purple eggplants, and a whole bunch of comfrey plants.  Comfrey is useful as a nutrient mulch because it accumulates minerals well.  Just chop it down a few times a year and put the leaves in your compost or around your heavy feeders (tomatoes, corn, broccoli, etc).  Who needs to buy chemical fertilizer?  Not this Snarky Gardener.

The AeroGardens have been producing well, giving me Jalapeno peppers, basil, cutting celery, parsley, and tomato cuttings (for starts).  The Mega Cherry tomatoes are just getting ripe, and will be eaten seconds after they are ready.  I will be saving the seeds from the red pepper to see if I can get them to grow.  Practice makes perfect when it comes to seed saving.  I tried to save the seeds from a green one, but they never spouted.  I should have better luck with the riper Jalapeno.

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Mega Cherry tomatoes – 5/7/2013
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Jalapeno peppers and Thai basil – 5/7/2013

Of course, with all these starts running around, I planted 6 in late April and early May to get some from under my feet (even with a chance of frost still possible).  This chance became reality on 5/13/2013 and 5/14/2013 as temperatures fell into to low 30’s overnight.  Overturned pots became makeshift protectors inside the steel fence tomato cages.  I did lose one Sweet 100 Cherry tomato plant as the pot I covered it with was too thin and holey.   Luckily I have more plants where that came from.

On 5/12/2013, the first of the potato leaves poked their heads out (and were promptly frosted).  I’ve been checking on them from time to time, finding a few that turned rotten.  I’m not sure if this was caused by using the leaf mulch (it’s pretty wet in places) or the potatoes themselves, but I pulled any that didn’t look good.  Fortunately the Snarky Gardener is smart enough to have extra potatoes that he didn’t plant the first time, so those will fill in any open spots.

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Potatoes sprouting up from leaf mulch – 5/12/2013
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Potatoes coming up by my kale – 5/17/2013